Freshwater Life

Freshwater Life book cover

New field guide by C·I·B Core Team Member describes life in freshwater more...

Who we are

The C·I·B is an inter-institutional Centre of Excellence established in 2004 within the DST-NRF Centres of Excellence Programme. Its members undertake research on the biodiversity consequences of biological invasions, largely through post-graduate student training. The principal aims of the Centre's work are to reduce the rates and impacts of biological invasions by furthering scientific understanding and predictive capability, and by developing research capacity.

The C·I·B has its physical home at the University of Stellenbosch, but comprises a network of senior researchers and their associated postdoctoral associates and graduate students throughout South Africa. Find out more about us.

Quest Special Issue

Quest Vol 11(2) Cover

The C·I·B has collaborated with Quest to produce a special issue of the magazine dedicated to biological invasions in South Africa. The articles in the special issue provide a rich overview of some of the exciting and important issues that are being addressing under the banner of “invasion science”.

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Highlighted Paper

Global monitoring of biological invasions brought to the next level

Participants of the workshop in Leipzig in March 2015

What variables should be monitored to aid the management of invasive species? Applying the concept of essential biodiversity variables, a new study identified three essential variables for invasion monitoring; alien species occurrence, status and impact. This minimum information set can then be delivered by joint, complementary contributions from countries and global community initiatives.

Published book

Front cover of Plant Invasions in Protected Areas: Patterns, Problems and Challenges

Plant Invasions in Protected Areas: Patterns, Problems and Challenges

by Llewellyn C. Foxcroft, Petr Pyšek, David M. Richardson and Piero Genovesi.

The topic of plant invasions in protected areas is dealt with comprehensively in a new book edited by researchers at the Centre for Invasion Biology (C·I·B), SANParks, the Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Charles University in Prague and the IUCN's Invasive Species Specialist Group. The book provides a global review of all aspects of alien plant invasions in protected areas.

For Students

Photo: J. Shaw In support of our vision, we are offering bursaries to students who are studying towards an Honours, Masters or Doctoral degree in biodiversity, environmental sociology or invasion biology. Click on links to the left under “Student & Research support” to find out more about the support and bursaries that are on offer.


C·I·B's first decade

Read a short overview titled Invasion science for society: A decade of contributions from the Centre for Invasion Biology in South African Journal of Science (no subscription required)

24 October 2016

Using the Generic Impact Scoring System (GISS) can be a helpful tool for managers to identify invasive alien plant species with high environmental and social impacts.

18 October 2016

Two biological control agents maintain the potential to be effective agents against bugweed, after the incorporation of plant ecophysiology and climatic modelling in the assessment of their effectiveness.

11 October 2016

A recent study, led by C·I·B Post-doc Ana Nunes, highlights the danger of an invasive freshwater crayfish reaching the Okavango Delta and the potential devastating consequences for the ecology of this UNESCO World Heritage Site.

07 October 2016

Raquel Garcia, from the Centre for Invasion Biology is one of three postgraduate researchers from Stellenbosch University honoured with the L'Oréal-UNESCO Regional Fellowships For Women in Science (FWIS) in Sub-Saharan Africa…

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Read a review of the book by James A Drake et al. in Biological Invasions

Past C·I·B Events