Southern Hemisphere Network on Conifer Invasions - SHNCI

   The Bariloche Declaration on Invasive Alien Conifers in South America

  English | Español | Português

 

 

Download the pdf file (Acrobat Reader needed)

English | Español | Português


The Bariloche Declaration on Invasive Alien Conifers in South America

 

Following an international meeting on conifer invasions held in Bariloche, Argentina, from May 10 to 12 2007, the undersigned participants urge South American countries to act against conifer invasions throughout the continent. Given that:

• Conifers have been introduced from the northern hemisphere into southern hemisphere countries for centuries, but especially since the 1800s, initially mostly for timber production and later for pulp and paper;

• Forestry products from conifer plantations provide opportunities for economic growth, but these plantations can also lead to invasions;

• Many of these introduced species have become invasive, colonizing areas beyond plantations or cultivation, with significant impacts on biodiversity and ecological functions, including reducing water availability, increasing the intensity and frequency of fires, and changing natural landscapes;

• There has been a large effort to introduce and promote conifers in the past 50 years in South America. The majority of introduced trees belong to the genus Pinus, which were tested in different geographies and climates, then selected and widely cultivated;

• In some countries introduced conifers now constitute more than 50% of forest plantations, and different species are also used as shade trees, windbreaks, roadside plantings and ornamentals;

• After this half century of planting, many reports have appeared of conifers escaping cultivation and invading natural and disturbed habitats;

• Given the history and scale of invasions and recorded impacts of invasions and of plantations in other countries such as New Zealand, Australia, and South Africa, it would be prudent to use experience gained there to avoid conflicts of interest and spare the richest biodiversity in South America from the impacts of conifer invasions;

• If left uncontrolled, conifer invasions may foreclose future options for using land for other productive purposes;

• South American climates may foster the process of conifer invasions if specific prevention and control measures are not adopted as integral parts of plantation forest management. There are two key differences between the initial introductions in other continents and the current process in South America. (1) The present expansion in South America is stimulated by unprecedented levels of globalization, with plantations of much broader scale than in the past century; (2) Many habitats being planted with conifers in South America have already been disturbed;

• Climate change may also affect conifer invasions and thereby alter natural areas, enhancing opportunities for invasion;

• A few countries that have long dealt with these problems have established at least partial solutions for the conflicts of interest generated by invasions and the use of land for forestry, including guidelines and legal instruments.

Action now will save effort and cost later. We urge South American nations to adopt conifer invasion prevention and control measures to protect their natural resources and unique ecosystems, and to this end we propose the following measures to improve management of forest plantations:

Recommendations on regulating invasions

• Implement risk assessment procedures for all types of plantings and new introductions;

• Assure that every plantation for commercial production has a qualified professional in charge of its management, and a management plan registered in the relevant resource agency;

• Management plans should contain strategies and implementation measures for the prevention, control, and monitoring of spread. Establish plantations so as to exclude sites highly likely to foster spread (such as hilltops, riparian areas, areas exposed to strong winds);

• Implementation of control measures should be audited independently;

• Discourage use of invasive species for other purposes than commercial production (such as ornamental plantings, windbreaks, roadside plantings, and firewood);

• Encourage clearance of spread-prone planted conifers from abandoned plantations.

Forest Certification

• If not already included, practices for prevention and control of invasive species must be added to certification criteria throughout South America.

• Check that certification agencies verify this requirement, as it has been widely overlooked and may require capacity-building of certifiers.

Education

• Include management of invasions in professional curricula for university courses related to forestry activities and management.

• Improve public awareness of biological invasions.

Signatories

Bustamante, R., Dr in Ecology, Institute of Ecology and Biodiversity, University of Chile, Chile;

Castro, S.A., (Dr. en Ecologia) Caseb, Departamento de Ecologia, Facultad de Ciencias Biologicas, Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile;

Nuñez, M.A., Ecologist, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA;

Pauchard, A., PhD (Forest Ecologist) Facultad de Ciencias Forestales Universidad de Concepción, Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad, Chile;

Peña, E., Ecologist, Universidad de Concepción, Facultad de Ciencias Forestales, Chile;

Raffaele, E., (Dra. En Ecologia), Lab. Ecotono, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Argentina;

Relva, M.A., Dr in Biology, Researcher of Conicet, Lab. Ecotono, Universidad Nacional del Comahue. Quintral 1250 (8400) Bariloche, Rio Negro Argentina Lab. Ecotono, Argentina;

Richardson, D.M., Deputy Director, Centre for Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa & Member IUCN Species Survival Specialist Groups on Conifers and Invasive Species;

Sarasola, M.M., Ing. Forestal, Conifer invasions ecologist, Coordinador del Area Forestal, Estación Experimental Agropecuaria, INTA Bariloche, Argentina;

Simberloff, D., Ph.D. (Biology), Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA;

van Wilgen, B.W., Chief Forest Ecologist, CSIR, South Africa;

Zalba, S. (Dr. in Biology) Nacional Lead I3N Argentina. GEKKO – Grupo de Estudios en Conservación y Manejo, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Argentina;

Zenni, R.D., South America Invasive Species Program, The Nature Conservancy, Brazil;

Ziller, S.R, Coordinator South America Invasive Species Program, The Nature Conservancy, The Hórus Institute for Environmental Conservation and Development, Brazil.

 

 

Back to the top


DECLARACIÓN DE BARILOCHE SOBRE CONÍFERAS INVASORAS EN SUDAMÉRICA

 

A partir de una reunión internacional sobre invasiones de coníferas desarrollada en Bariloche, Argentina, entre el 10 y el 12 de mayo de 2007, los participantes que firman al pie urgen a los países sudamericanos a actuar en contra de las invasiones de coníferas en todo el continente, considerando que:

• Las coníferas han sido introducidas desde el Hemisferio Norte en países del Hemisferio Sur durante siglos, pero con mayor intensidad a partir de 1800, en un principio para la producción de madera y más tarde para pulpa y papel;

• Los productos forestales obtenidos a partir de plantaciones de coníferas proveen oportunidades para el crecimiento económico, pero esas plantaciones pueden llevar también a procesos de invasión;

• Muchas de estas especies introducidas se han tornado invasoras, colonizando áreas más allá de las plantaciones o de las áreas de cultivo, con impactos significativos sobre la biodiversidad y las funciones ecológicas, reduciendo la disponibilidad de agua, incrementando la intensidad y frecuencia de los incendios y cambiando el paisaje natural;

• En los últimos 50 años se ha realizado un gran esfuerzo para introducir y promover el uso de las coníferas en Sudamérica. La mayoría de los árboles introducidos pertenecen al género Pinus, y fueron probados en diferentes climas y geografías para ser posteriormente seleccionados y ampliamente cultivados;

• En algunos países las coníferas introducidas representan hoy más del 50% de las plantaciones forestales y distintas especies son utilizadas también para sombra, cortinas corta-viento, plantaciones de borde de caminos y carreteras y como ornamentales;

• Transcurrido medio siglo de plantación, existen numerosos reportes de coníferas que escapan de las áreas de plantación e invaden hábitats naturales y disturbados;

• Dadas la historia y la escala de las invasiones y los registros existentes acerca del impacto de las invasiones y plantaciones en otros países como Nueva Zelanda, Australia y Sudáfrica, sería prudente aprovechar la experiencia ganada allí para evitar conflictos de intereses y para proteger la rica biodiversidad sudamericana del impacto de las coníferas invasoras;

• Si no son contenidas, las invasiones de coníferas pueden coartar futuras opciones de uso de la tierra para otros propósitos productivos;

• Los climas sudamericanos podrían promover el proceso de invasión de coníferas si no se adoptan medidas específicas de prevención y control como parte integral del manejo forestal. Existen dos diferencias clave entre las introducciones iniciales en otros países y el proceso en desarrollo en Sudamérica. (1) La expansión actual en Sudamérica se ve estimulada por niveles de globalización sin precedentes, con plantaciones a una escala mucho mayor que las del siglo pasado; (2) Muchos de los hábitats plantados con coníferas en Sudamérica ya se encuentran disturbados;

• El cambio climático también podría afectar las invasiones de coníferas, alterando las áreas naturales e incrementando las oportunidades de invasión;
• Algunos países que han enfrentado estos problemas durante mucho tiempo han establecido al menos soluciones parciales para los conflictos de intereses generados por las invasiones y por el uso forestal de la tierra, incluyendo lineamientos de manejo e instrumentos legales.

Las acciones presentes ahorrarán costos y esfuerzos en el futuro. Urgimos a las naciones de Sudamérica a adoptar medidas de prevención y control de invasiones de coníferas para proteger sus recursos naturales y sus ecosistemas únicos y para ello proponemos las siguientes medidas tendientes a mejorar el manejo de las plantaciones forestales:

Recomendaciones para regular las actividades relacionadas con coníferas invasoras

• Implementar procedimientos de análisis de riesgo para todos los tipos de plantaciones y para nuevas introducciones;

• Asegurar que toda plantación con fines productivos cuente con un profesional calificado a cargo y con un plan de manejo registrado en la agencia competente;

• Incluir estrategias y acciones para la prevención, control y monitoreo de dispersión en los planes de manejo. Establecer las plantaciones de modo de evitar áreas con altas probabilidades de actuar como focos de dispersión (tales como cumbres de cerros, márgenes de ríos y arroyos y áreas expuestas a vientos fuertes);

• Desarrollar mecanismos de auditoría independiente para la implementación de las medidas de control;

• Desalentar el uso de especies invasoras para otros propósitos que no sean la producción comercial (plantaciones ornamentales, cortinas rompe-viento, plantación a lo largo de caminos o carreteras y producción de leña);

• Promover la eliminación de plantaciones abandonadas de coníferas con tendencia invasora.

Certificación Forestal

• Incorporar las prácticas de prevención y control de especies invasoras a los criterios de certificación en toda Sudamérica, si es que aún no forman parte de ellos.

• Confirmar que las agencias de certificación verifican este requerimiento, ya que ha sido ampliamente ignorado y podría requerir una capacitación especial de los agentes de certificación.

Educación

• Incluir el manejo de invasiones biológicas en los contenidos de cursos universitarios relacionados con la actividad forestal.

• Mejorar la conciencia pública acerca de las invasiones biológicas.

Firmantes

Bustamante, R., Dr en Ecología, Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad, Universidad de Chile, Chile;

Castro, S.A., Dr. en Ecología, Caseb, Departamento de Ecología, Facultad de Ciencias Biológicas, Universidad Católica de Chile, Chile;

Nuñez, M.A., Ecologist, Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA;

Pauchard, A., PhD, Forest Ecologist, Facultad de Ciencias Forestales Universidad de Concepción, Instituto de Ecología y Biodiversidad, Chile;

Peña, E., Ecologist, Universidad de Concepción, Facultad de Ciencias Forestales, Chile;

Raffaele, E., Dra. en Ecologia, Lab. Ecotono, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Argentina;

Relva, M.A., Dra. en Biología, Investigadora del Conicet, Lab. Ecotono, Universidad Nacional del Comahue. Quintral 1250 (8400) Bariloche, Rio Negro Argentina Lab. Ecotono, Argentina;

Richardson, D.M., Deputy Director, Centre for Invasion Biology, Stellenbosch University, South Africa & Member IUCN Species Survival Specialist Groups on Conifers and Invasive Species;

Sarasola, M.M., Ing. Forestal, Ecólogo especialista en coníferas invasoras, Coordinador del Área Forestal, Estación Experimental Agropecuaria, INTA Bariloche, Argentina;

Simberloff, D., Ph.D. (Biology), Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology, University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA;

van Wilgen, B.W., Chief Forest Ecologist, CSIR, South Africa;

Zalba, S., Dr. en Biología, Líder Nacional I3N Argentina. GEKKO – Grupo de Estudios en Conservación y Manejo, Universidad Nacional del Sur, Argentina;

Zenni, R.D., Programa de Especies Exóticas Invasoras para Sudamérica, The Nature Conservancy, Brasil;

Ziller, S.R, Ing. Forestal, Dra. En Conservación de la Naturaleza, Coordinadora del Programa de Especies Exóticas Invasoras para Sudamérica, The Nature Conservancy, Instituto Hórus de Desarrollo y Conservación Ambiental, Brasil

 

 

Topo de la pagina


DECLARAÇÃO DE BARILOCHE SOBRE CONÍFERAS EXÓTICAS INVASORAS NA AMÉRICA DO SUL

 

Na seqüência de um encontro internacional sobre invasões biológicas de coníferas realizado em Bariloche, Argentina, de 10 a 12 de maio de 2007, os signatários deste documento requerem aos países da América do Sul que ajam contra a invasão de coníferas em todo o continente. Dado que:

• Diversas coníferas vem sendo introduzidas de países do hemisfério norte para o hemisfério sul há séculos, mas especialmente desde 1800, inicialmente em grande parte para produção de madeira e mais tarde para polpa e papel;

• Os produtos florestais de plantações de coníferas abrem oportunidades para o crescimento econômico, mas essas plantações também podem levar a processos de invasão biológica;

• Diversas dessas espécies de coníferas introduzidas se tornaram invasoras, colonizando áreas além dos plantios ou das áreas de cultivo, com impactos significativos à biodiversidade e a funções ecológicas que incluem a redução da disponibilidade de água, o aumento na intensidade e freqüência de incêndios e a modificação de paisagens naturais;

• Tem havido um grande esforço para introduzir e promover coníferas nos últimos 50 anos na América do Sul. A maioria das árvores introduzidas pertence ao gênero Pinus, havendo sido testadas em diferentes áreas geográficas e climáticas, depois selecionadas e amplamente cultivadas;

• Em alguns países, as coníferas introduzidas atualmente formam mais de 50% das plantações florestais e diferentes espécies são também usadas como árvores para sombreamento, quebra-vento, plantios à margem de estradas e fins ornamentais;

• Após esse meio século de plantio apareceram muitos relatos de coníferas que escapam das áreas de cultivo e invadem ambientes naturais e degradados;

• Dada a história e a escala das invasões e dos impactos registrados de invasões e de plantios em outros países como a Nova Zelândia, a Austrália e a África do Sul, seria prudente utilizar a experiência acumulada nesses locais para evitar conflitos de interesses e poupar a grande riqueza de diversidade biológica da América do Sul dos impactos de coníferas invasoras;

• Se deixadas sem controle, as invasões de coníferas podem inviabilizar futuras opções de uso da terra para outros fins produtivos;

• As condições climáticas da América do Sul podem facilitar processos de invasão de coníferas se medidas específicas de prevenção e manejo não forem adotadas como parte integral do manejo florestal. Existem duas diferenças-chave entre a introdução inicial de coníferas em outros continentes em séculos anteriores e o processo atual na América do Sul. (1) A atual expansão de uso dessas espécies na América do Sul é estimulada por níveis de globalização sem precedentes, com plantios de muito maior escala do que no século passado; (2) muitos dos ambientes em uso para plantio com coníferas na América do Sul já sofreram perturbações antrópicas;

• As mudanças climáticas podem também afetar as invasões de coníferas e portanto alterar ambientes naturais, aumentando as oportunidades para invasão;

• Alguns países que há muito vêm trabalhando esses problemas já estabeleceram pelo menos soluções parciais aos conflitos de interesse gerados por invasões biológicas e o uso da terra para atividades de produção florestal, incluindo diretrizes e instrumentos legais.

Entrar em ação agora vai poupar esforços e custos maiores mais tarde. Pedimos urgência aos países da América do Sul para que adotem medidas de prevenção e controle para proteger seus recursos naturais e ecossistemas únicos, propondo para esse fim que as seguintes medidas sejam tomadas para melhorar o manejo de plantações florestais:

Recomendações para regulamentação legal

• Implementar procedimentos de análise de risco para todos os tipos de plantios e novas introduções de espécies.

• Garantir que todo plantio para produção comercial tenha um profissional qualificado responsável pelo manejo e um plano de manejo registrado na agência governamental responsável.

• Os planos de manejo devem incluir estratégias e medidas de implementação para a prevenção, controle e monitoramento da dispersão de espécies exóticas invasoras. Os plantios devem ser estabelecidos de forma a excluir áreas com alta probabilidade de funcionarem como pontos de dispersão (tais como topos de morros, ambientes ripários, áreas expostas a ventos fortes).

• A implementação de medidas de controle deve ser auditada de forma independente.

• Desencorajar o uso de espécies exóticas invasoras para outros fins além da produção comercial (como uso ornamental, plantios à margem de estradas e lenha).

• Encorajar o corte e a erradicação de cultivos abandonados de coníferas de potencial invasor.

Certificação Florestal

• Caso ainda não incluídas, devem ser incorporadas práticas de controle de espécies exóticas invasoras a critérios de certificação na América do Sul.

• Solicita-se às agências de certificação que verifiquem a execução desse critério, pois o mesmo tem sido amplamente ignorado e pode requerer capacitação e treinamento para certificadores.

Educação

• Incluir o manejo de espécies exóticas invasoras em currículos profissionais relacionados à engenharia florestal e manejo florestal.

• Melhorar o conhecimento público do tema de invasões biológicas.

Signatários

Bustamante, R., Dr. em Ecologia, Instituto de Ecologia e Biodiversidade, Universidade do Chile, Chile;

Castro, S.A., (Dr. em Ecologia) Caseb, Departamento de Ecologia, Faculdade de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade Católica do Chile, Chile;

Nuñez, M.A., Ecólogo, Departamento de Ecologia e Biologia Evolutiva, Universidade do Tennessee, Universidade do Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA;

Pauchard, A., PhD (Ecólogo Florestal) Faculdade de Ciências Florestais Universidade de Concepción, Instituto de Ecologia e Biodiversidade, Chile;

Peña, E., Ecólogo, Universidade de Concepción, Faculdade de Ciências Florestais, Chile;

Raffaele, E., (Dra. em Ecologia), Lab. Ecotono, Universidade Nacional de Comahue, Argentina;

Relva, M.A., Dr. em Biologia e Pesquisa de Conicet, Lab. Ecotono, Universidade Nacional de Comahue. Quintral 1250 (8400) Bariloche, Rio Negro Argentina Lab. Ecotono, Argentina;

Richardson, D.M., Diretor, Centro de Invasões Biológicas, Universidade de Stellenbosch, África do Sul & Membro dos Grupos Especialistas da IUCN em Coníferas e Espécies Invasoras;

Sarasola, M.M., Eng. Florestal, Ecólogo em invasões de coníferas, Coordenador da Área Florestal, Estação Experimental Agropecuária, INTA Bariloche, Argentina;

Simberloff, D., Ph.D. (Biologia), Departamento de Ecologia e Biologia da Evolução, Universidade do Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee, USA;

van Wilgen, B.W., Ecólogo Florestal Chefe, CSIR, África do Sul;

Zalba, S. (Dr. em Biologia) Líder Nacional da I3N Argentina, GEKKO – Grupo de Estudos em Conservação e Manejo, Universidade Nacional del Sur, Argentina;

Zenni, R.D., Eng. Florestal, Programa de Espécies Exóticas Invasoras para a América do Sul, The Nature Conservancy, Brasil;

Ziller, S.R. (Dr. em Conservação da Natureza) Coordenadora do Programa de Espécies Exóticas Invasoras para a América do Sul, The Nature Conservancy, Instituto Hórus de Desenvolvimento e Conservação Ambiental, Brasil.

 

 

Topo da página