Theology Stellenbosch

 

PROF. JEREMY PUNT

Associate Professor (New Testament)


Tel: +27 21 808 2615 | Fax: +27 21 808 3251 | Email

Background

Jeremy Punt was born in 1962 in Bellville, en after matriculating in 1980 at Bellville High School he studied theology at the University of Stellenbosch, where he obtained all his formal qualifications. He specialised in the New Testament, and wrote his doctoral dissertation on “Paul on freedom: Implications for hermeneutics and theology" (completed 1999). Jeremy became a lecturer in New Testament and Practical Theology at the University of Fort Hare, where he was later promoted to associated professor. During his time at Fort Hare, Jeremy taught New Testament, Biblical Studies, Greek as well as Classical Culture. He regular attended national as well as international conferences where he read several papers, published a number of academic papers as journal articles and chapters in books, and received a few awards in recognition of his research. During 1995 and 2001 Jeremy was a guest lecturer at the University of Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where he taught a few modules. He was the Director of Quality Assurance from September 2002 until he left the University of Fort Hare in December 2003. Jeremy was also from 1993 until he left the Eastern Cape at the end of 2003, an ordained, bivocational minister in the Uniting Reformed Church congregation of Middellande, with contractual responsibilities for the URC Bedford.
Jeremy was appointed senior lecturer in New Testament, at the Faculty of Theology at Stellenbosch in January 2004, and promoted to Associate Professor in April 2007.

Career, Degrees, Qualifications

Studied theology at the University of Stellenbosch: 1981-1989

University of Fort Hare:

Lecturer in New Testament and Practical Theology at the: 1991-2000

Associate professor in New Testament and Practical Theology: 2000-2003.

Director of Quality Assurance (seconded): September 2002-December 2003

Stellenbosch University:

Senior lecturer in New Testament studies at: January 2004-March 2007

Associate Professor: April 2007-

 

Qualifications:

BA (Greek and Hebrew) cum laude 1983; BA Hons (Greek) cum laude 1984; MA (Greek) cum laude 1988; BTh cum laude 1988; MTh (New Testament) cum laude 1989; DTh (New Testament) 1999

Vision

The interpretation of the Bible today is at the same time an exciting adventure and an immense responsibility, and in this I wish to guide students, with the long-term goal that they will become mature and well-rounded hermeneuts and exegetes. The study of the New Testament is in the end about making sense of texts, the ability to account for the meaning of the New Testament, in a responsible way, in a variety of contexts. On this score and both in terms of contents and methodology, the interpretative processes are of great importance. Sustained and keen attention to and research on the New Testament within the many, different contexts in which these texts are used today, are in many ways present in my current research interests

Research Areas

Biblical hermeneutics and the Pauline letters (including Intertextuality and the use of Scripture in the Pauline letters)

  • Paul and the interpretation of the Scriptures of Israel: Flowing from doctoral work and various conference papers and published articles, this discipline-specific research relates to historical, literary and theological/religious reciprocity(ies) and intertextualities. Important inter-religious aspects flow from this investigation, relating not exclusively but in particular to Judaism and Christianity


Position, role and use of the Bible in Africa (including issues related to hermeneutics, translation, and postcolonial theory): A number of subsidiary if broad themes are currently being researched:

  • The Bible and culture, in southern Africa in particular

  • The postcolonial Bible in Africa. Postcolonial cultural studies through its involvement in a broad network of conflicting attempts at intervention into the master narrative of Western discourse, is of essential importance for rereading the biblical texts in Africa, in particular. Various aspects have in the past been researched, with the current focus on postcolonial biblical hermeneutics.

Religion, sacred scriptures and identity (including notions of enscripturalised identity, Pauline theology of the body, and gender issues in the New Testament)

  • The Bible, communities and identity: In this research, the focus is on an investigation into the relationship and reciprocal dynamics between sacred scripture and identity in communities of faith, with particular emphasis on Christianity. The notion of "Scripture" and "scriptural community" deserves more attention in the (post)modern world, given their significance in the formation, sustaining and changing of patterns of identification and their influence on individuals, communities and public life in general - as shown in current world events, following the September 11 attacks in the USA.

  • Bible and Body: This project involves a number of subsidiary but mutually informing investigations: the relationship between the argument from nature and, gender and human sexuality; the biblical basis of conceptions of human sexual activity as morally questionable ("sin"); body theology and gender differentiation; Queer Theory and biblical interpretation.

The New Testament and Cultural Studies (including the use of New Testament imagery, motifs and allusion in popular culture and media). Investigating how cultural studies within biblical criticism can seek to integrate, in different ways, the historical, formalist, and socio-cultural questions and concerns of other paradigms on a different key, with a situated and interested reader and interpreter always at its core.

The Bible and power
The relationship between religion/theology and power, in ecclesial as well as public settings is important especially where community development is a focus. The focus in this research has so far been on the pedagogical, but related investigations will include a hermeneutical investigation of New Testament texts on power, and their earliest as well as contemporary use, abuse and influence in communities.

Courses

During the first semester, Jeremy Punt teaches the following modules:

  • NT 322: Pauline letters: Introduction and Exegesis

  • NT 414: Johannine writings and Revelation: Introduction, Exegesis and Theology

During the second semester, he is responsible for:

  • NT 352: Pauline letters: Theology and Exegesis

  • NT 444: General epistles and Hebrews

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